Mirrors, Westworld and Hypocrisy

man_looking_in_mirrorPhoto: http://img.jillkonrath.com/hs-fs/hub/110248/file-22797243-jpg/images/man_looking_in_mirror.jpg

We seem rarely to see ourselves as we really are when we look in the mirror. This can be a good thing (as when we aspire to be better) or a very, very bad thing (as when we fail to see a fixable flaw that is obvious to everyone else). This election season I’ve found myself shouting at my TV screen at certain advocates — “Really?! OMG, look in the mirror!” These people spew hateful, bigoted comments while declaring themselves proponents of family values, defenders of the poor, and good Christians.

Why the disconnect?

I think that, when such folks look themselves in the mirror, they see what they want to see, as in the Mirror of Erised at Hogwarts in the Harry Potter novels. Why is it so easy to overlook what is objectively before our eyes? Part of the answer for me comes from the new Netflix series Westworld in which guests visit a fantasy western world populated by extremely lifelike robots. I’ll focus on just one aspect of the series: the creators debrief the “hosts” periodically, but calling them into a minimalist lab and asking them questions. The hosts (and hence the actors) sit naked on a chair and, if they go into cold storage, stand naked in lines. I can only imagine how vulnerable a person (or actor) must feel being so exposed. As a TV viewer, I find myself feeling uncomfortable on their behalf. Therefore, it seems to me that people easily tune out what they don’t want to see, either physically or metaphorically, when looking in the mirror.

We all need to be better, to acknowledge the reality of our judgmental natures. Only then can we begin to address them.

 

 

UHS Homecoming 2016

16uhshcspiritMy high school site is unique in its tradition of decorating entire hallways for Spirit Week. Each day all students dress up according to a theme, culminating in Spirit Night on Thursday where class councils bring in the decorations they’ve been working on all quarter. On Friday morning students tour around and a committee of staff have the difficult task of awarding points. This year the Seniors won, followed by Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen. My few pictures here fail to do their amazing work justice. EVERY locker mural was outstanding, and many of the smaller elements such as Cinderella’s coach and  the working WALL-E robot were impressive. But below, from 12-9th grade are a few tastes of Homecoming 2016.

Seniors: Disney Princesses — Rapunzel’s tower, Beauty and the Beast mural

Juniors: Imagination– Peter Pan mural, Jolly Roger pirate ship

Sophomores: Lion King / Finding Nemo / Ratatouille / A Bug’s Life —  Pride Rock, Finding Nemo painting

Freshmen: Video Games — Sugar Rush mural, Wreck It Ralph model

 

“The Last Lecture” — Help People


As part of our unit on The Value of Life, my elective class called Contemporary Studies watched Randy Pausch’s lecture called “Achieving Your Childhood Dreams.” Knowing he was dying of liver cancer, Pausch delivered a funny, moving, and inspirational talk on how to live a good life in which he described some highlights of his journey as a family man, a student and a professor. The best-selling book he published called The Last Lecture expands on the stories and lessons of his 75-minute speech. 

Pausch’s lecture contains so many meaningful lessons, but the one message that most resonated with me on this viewing was HELP PEOPLE. That’s a given in an educator’s job description, but it also describes an attitude for anyone in any profession or any role, including student. We can learn so much from connecting with others without expectation of personal gain. The beautiful irony is that, with that mindset, we often get back more than we give. Pausch calls that a “head fake” or indirect learning, where in the doing of a fun task we learn something difficult. My own beloved father Angelo Ozoa preached that lesson and lived it, as a doctor and community leader whose legacy includes an annual medical mission to needy areas in the Philippines. So go do what Randy and Angelo said — help people!

The Only Thing We Can Control

“You have power over your mind – not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.” ― Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Lately I’ve encountered problems where the ancient advice of stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius served me well. It’s easy for teachers to fall into the trap of taking events personally or feeling responsible for fixing difficult situations or reacting defensively. But sometimes our professional best can only take us so far. When we hit a wall in frustration, all we can control is our own reactions, not anyone else’s behaviors.

Sorry for the vague post. I never feel comfortable even hinting at details about problems involving students. Suffice it to say that putting myself in their complicated, emotional shoes helps me to react with compassion, not anger, with empathy, not enmity, with solutions, not punishments.

In other news, one of my favorite 20% Time Projects in the past two years was an AP Language student who read four biographies, including one of Marcus Aurelius, and ran the stock investment club at our high school. He wrote a 7,000 word guide to stoicism and value investing called The Stoic Investor, and self-published it on the Amazon Kindle store.

October is Filipino American History Month


My parents came to the United States as medical interns from the University of the Philippines to the Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen Park, a suburb of Chicago. After having four children and establishing themselves at the University of Chicago as a PhD in pathology and a pediatrician La Rabida, a tertiary care facility, they became citizens. We moved to Northern California, and we children all pursued advanced degrees, becoming a lawyer/teacher, nurse/manager, engineer and human resources training consultant. 

Filipino American History Month celebrates the work ethic and strong family values that have produced similar success stories in the Filipino-American community for over 4oo years. I’m very proud that my family, my “calabash” aunties and uncles and cousins, my community (geographic and online)  have contributed so much to the immense mixed salad that is our diverse and democratic country. May it continue to strenghthen and grow!

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Two Days at SDCC

imageThis July I got to experience Thursday and Friday of San Diego Comic-Con, thanks friends in the awesome crew of usual suspects with whom I’ve been attending scifi and fantasy conventions the past few years. While briefer than I’m used to, the two packed days fed my soul. Unlike past years, I did NOT spend the night in line for epic panels in Hall H or Ballroom 20. Nor did I venture off-site to ticketed shows or fan parties. I didn’t even spend more than an hour in the Exhibit Hall. SDCC is too huge for any one person to describe, but I’m happy with my experience.

The short notice precluded any fancy cosplay, but I did  walk around Friday with Bitty, my fire lizard, perched on my shoulder. We’re pictured at a Punished Props meetup on Friday with professional cosplayers Bill and Brittany Doran. I also brought her back to her home “colony,” (Imaginarium Galleries) where the dragon maker autographed her feet and I sprouted the cat ears in my photo above.

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My favorite panels this year were with artists, from a panel with MAD Magazine icons like Sergio Aragones to the new Betty and Veronica writer/artist Adam Hughes. I could knit while watching them created under the document camera. Also, it was worth waiting an hour or so in line for the Indigo Ballroom to see Kristen Bell (Veronica Mars) and Ted Danson promote a new show called “The Good Place” and the cast of “Silicon Valley” just being hilarious. I made a plug for educators’ roles in combating sexism in movies, and the panelists had all teachers in the room raise their hands. No, I can’t go an hour without mentioning my “kids” or finding connections to my curriculum.

Knitting content: just received a new shawl kit in the mail from Craftsy called Drachenfels. It’ll be next up after I finish the baby blanket.

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Why isn’t PBL everywhere now? Or Grandma’s Lasagna

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Photo source: sultana.com

My students have had tremendous success with 20% Time Projects aka Genius Hour, a variant of Project-Based Learning. Research has documented the benefits of learning this way and increases in standardized test scores. So why isn’t PBL everywhere now?

This article lays out a sensible description of the barriers and suggests changes. It’s a bit self-serving, but the author’s not wrong. His metaphor of Grandma’s lasagna is perfect. How can you expect people to want to make lasagna from scratch if they’ve never tasted it, much less possess the time or desire to work that hard when no one around them is doing it? PBL is delicious! Share it with your friends. Make your own.